July 2018 – Where to look for the planets

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Use the finder charts on this page to guide you to where to look for the planets in July 2018.

A few pointers:

  • All planets visible to the unaided eye look like stars. Planets visible to the unaided eye include Mercury, Venus, Earth (look down!), Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.
  • In a telescope, Uranus and Neptune are visible as tiny discs. The dwarf planet Pluto remains looking like a star in even the largest amateur telescope.
  • Stars are shown to magnitude 5 on the charts unless otherwise noted. This is a compromise between what you would see from the light polluted skies of a city (where you will see significantly less stars) and dark country skies (where you will see significantly more stars).
  • Unless otherwise noted, the finder charts are prepared for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. The charts will be useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia (including Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane).

15 July 2018 – Moon, Mercury, Venus and Regulus at the end of evening twilight

Moon, Mercury, Venus and Regulus (the brightest star in the ancient Greek constellation Leo The Lion) finder chart. Look above the North Western horizon. Chart prepared for 6.30 pm AEST on Sunday 15 July 2018 for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

16 July 2018 – Moon, Mercury, Venus and Regulus at the end of evening twilight

Moon, Mercury, Venus and Regulus (the brightest star in the ancient Greek constellation Leo The Lion) finder chart. Look above the North Western horizon. Chart prepared for 6.30 pm AEST on Monday 16 July 2018 for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

21 July 2018 – Moon and Jupiter at the end of evening twilight

Moon and Jupiter finder chart. Look above the North Western horizon. Chart prepared for 6.45 pm AEST on Saturday 21 July 2018 for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia).  Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

25 July 2018 – Moon, Mars and Saturn at the end of evening twilight

Moon, Mars and Saturn finder chart. Look above the Eastern horizon. Chart prepared for 6.45 pm AEST on Wednesday 25 July 2018 for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Note that Pluto is only visible with a large amateur telescope. Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

27 July 2018 – Moon, Mars and Saturn at the end of evening twilight

Moon, Mars and Saturn finder chart. Look above the Eastern horizon. Chart prepared for 6.45 pm AEST on Friday 27 July 2018 for the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Note that Pluto is only visible with a large amateur telescope. Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

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