Mercury now visible in morning sky

February 8, 2015 | By | 1 Comment
Send to Kindle

(Posted 8 February 2015) Mercury is now a morning object and can be seen low above the Eastern horizon in the morning twilight sky.

Moon, Jupiter and Regulus (the brightest star in the ancient Greek constellation Leo  The Lion) finder chart. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Wednesday 4 February 2015 for the Gold Coast, Queensland (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Mercury, Saturn and Antares (the brightest star in the ancient Greek constellation Scorpius The Scorpion) finder chart. Chart prepared for 4:30 am AEST / 5:30 am AEDT on Monday 9 February 2015 for the Gold Coast, Queensland (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

From our Earthbound perspective, Mercury will continue to move away from the Sun and become easier to locate with the unaided eye. Note that without a telescope it only appears as a star to the unaided eye.

Mercury reaches its greatest elongation from the Sun on 24 February 2015, meaning that it will get easier to locate. A slim crescent will be located to the left of the Moon on 17 February if you want confirmation that you are looking at the right star.

More 2015 planet finder charts can be found here on this site.

Filed in: Southern Hemisphere Sky Events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

About the Author (Author Profile)

This website is maintained by Paul Floyd. I am an amateur astronomer (and school teacher) with 25 years experience (as at 2015) in running a range of education and public astronomy outreach activities. As of January 2015, I have been providing astronomy information via the WWW for eighteen years.