Now available for free download: Solar eclipse pinhole viewer for 29 April 2014 partial solar eclipse

January 6, 2014 | By | 4 Comments
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As per my 2014 Astronomy Events Calendar, we are lucky enough in Australia to have two lunar eclipses and one partial solar eclipse this year. Unlike lunar eclipses, partial solar eclipses are not safe to look directly at without the use of specialist solar filters most commonly sold by telescope shops. There are a number of ways of projecting an image of the eclipsed Sun so that you can indirectly observe it without risking your eyesight. The simplest of these is to make a pinhole in a piece of paper and hold it so that the Sun’s image falls onto a piece of white card or paper.

As a souvenir of the 29 April 2014 partial solar eclipse, I have made a solar eclipse pinhole viewer which has eclipse visibility times for a variety of locations across Australia. There are also images on the viewer showing the appearance of the Sun at maximum eclipse for these locations (Banora Point / Tweed Heads, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Gold Coast, Melbourne, Perth, Rockhampton, Sydney and Townsville).

Download the free viewer (Adobe Acrobat format): Partial Solar Eclipse Pinhole Viewer 29 April 2014

Image of Solar Eclipse Pinhole viewer for the partial solar eclipse on 29 April 2014. Click on the link in the preceding paragraph to download the viewer as a pdf file.

Image of Solar Eclipse Pinhole viewer for the partial solar eclipse on 29 April 2014. Click on the link in the preceding paragraph to download the viewer as a pdf file.

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About the Author (Author Profile)

This website is maintained by Paul Floyd. I am an amateur astronomer (and school teacher) with 25 years experience (as at 2015) in running a range of education and public astronomy outreach activities. As of January 2015, I have been providing astronomy information via the WWW for eighteen years.