Watch as Venus eclipses a star tomorrow morning. Visible across Eastern Australia.

April 16, 2014 | By | 1 Comment
Send to Kindle

(Posted 16 April 2014) Even if you aren’t an early riser, you might want to consider dusting off your telescope, setting your alarm clock and getting up early tomorrow morning to watch Venus eclipse (or occult) a star tomorrow morning.

Hydor (3.7 magnitude star in Aquarius 'The Water Bearer') reappears from behind Venus after being occulted. Chart prepared for the Gold Coast, Queensland. Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Hydor (3.7 magnitude star in Aquarius ‘The Water Bearer’) reappearing from behind Venus after being occulted. Chart prepared for the Gold Coast, Queensland. A similar view Chart prepared using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

While you won’t need a telescope to locate Venus (it will be the dazzlingly bright star located above the Eastern horizon in the pre-dawn sky), you will need the high magnification provided by a telescope to view the brief eclipse (or occultation) of the 3.7 magnitude star Hydor. Hydor (a name which means water) also known by its catalog name Lamda Aquarii is located in the constellation Aquarius ‘The Water Bearer’.

I have never seen a planet eclipse a star so will be definitely up watching. I am expecting that the glare of Venus will make seeing the disappearance of Hydor behind it difficult to see. Seeing Hydor pop back into view from behind the unlit (night) side of Venus should be very exciting.

Below: Disappearance / reappearance times calculated using the Sky Safari Pro tablet app.

City Disappearance Reappearance
Cairns (Qld) 3:58 am AEST 4:05 am AEST
Brisbane (Qld) 3:59 am AEST 4:05 am AEST
Gold Coast (Qld) 3:59 am AEST 4:05 am AEST
Sydney (NSW) 3:59 am AEST 4:04 am AEST
Canberra (ACT) 3:59 am AEST 4:04 am AEST
Melbourne (Vic) 3:59 am AEST 4:04 am AEST
Hobart (Tas) 4:00 am AEST 4:04 am AEST
Perth (WA) Not visible Not visible

And for those interested in astronomy trivia, Venus last occulted a star in June 2013.

Filed in: Southern Hemisphere Sky Events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

About the Author (Author Profile)

This website is maintained by Paul Floyd. I am an amateur astronomer (and school teacher) with 25 years experience (as at 2015) in running a range of education and public astronomy outreach activities. As of January 2015, I have been providing astronomy information via the WWW for eighteen years.